SanDisk Announces 'Sansa Clip': a Tiny, Wearable MP3 Player

August 27, 2007
Sansa Clip with Golf Ball
Sansa Clip with Golf Ball

SanDisk Corporation, the second largest seller of MP3 players in the United States, today introduced the colorful Sansa Clip, a tiny MP3 player that boasts an array of cool features, as well as distinctively big sound for its small size.

Perfect for the fitness buff or traveler, the compact Sansa Clip comes with a fashionable clip for wearing, FM radio with recorder, microphone, long-lasting rechargeable battery and a bright screen for exceptionally easy navigation of tunes.

The Sansa Clip is expected to be available this fall at manufacturer’s suggested retail prices of $39.99 for a 1 gigabyte (GB) player and $59.99 for the 2GB unit.

“Don’t let the Sansa Clip’s size fool you,” said Keith Washo, SanDisk retail product marketing manager for the Sansa Clip. “This tiny player packs a powerful, feature-rich punch. We’re excited to bring music lovers a new, cool-looking player with great sound and audio offerings in a body that’s smaller than a match box.”

Consumers can also show off their style by choosing from an array of colors. The Sansa Clip comes in sleek black, candy apple red, hot pink and ice blue.

The Sansa Clip supports many music download and subscription services, including Rhapsody To Go, Napster, eMusic and others. It’s designed to work seamlessly with a wide range of popular music formats such as MP3, WAV, Audible (for audio books) and Windows Media Audio (WMA) in both unprotected and protected files (such as those WMA files purchased from music stores). The Sansa Clip can also play "DRM-free" MP3 downloads.

The player is expected to be available from retailers in the U.S. and Europe in September 2007.

Source: SanDisk

Explore further: Sandisk Launches Sansa Car Transmitter to Play MP3 Music Through a Car Radio

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