Rare intact tomb found in Italy

Aug 15, 2007

A 2,000-year-old Etruscan tomb containing the remains of at least 16 people has been found intact in Italy's Tuscany region.

Archaeology team leader Andrea Marcocci said the discovery was made near the town of Civitella Paganico, which is near Grosseto, the Italian news agency ANSA reported Tuesday. The burial site dated to between the 1st and 3rd centuries BC, and an inscription was found confirming it was an Etruscan tomb.

"It is rare to find a tomb so intact and well preserved," Marcocci said.

The human remains were found in urns, ANSA said.

The project, which began in late July, is the work of a group called Odysseus and is being overseen by the Tuscan Archaeological Superintendent's Department.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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