Mars equipment is field-tested in Norway

August 15, 2007

An international group of space scientists and engineers are in Svalbard, Norway, field-testing instruments for future Mars missions.

The Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition is designed to take advantage of similarities between the conditions on Mars and those at Svalbard in conducting scientific research in preparation for future space exploration, such as the European Space Agency's ExoMars mission and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Mars Science Laboratory.

The expedition is led by Hans Amundsen from the Earth and Planetary Exploration Services in Oslo, Norway, in collaboration with Andrew Steele of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and scientists and engineers from other NASA and ESA-related institutions.

The expedition, which started Sunday, continues until Aug. 26.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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