Glenn Experiments to Fly on Next Shuttle Mission

August 6, 2007

When space shuttle Endeavour blasts off from Cape Canaveral on its STS-118 mission, it will be carrying two experiments built at NASA's Glenn Research Center.

At 6:36 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, August 8, Endeavour will carry the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME) and the Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2 (CSLM-2) Experiment. Both experiments were designed and built according to stringent flight hardware requirements to be operated onboard the International Space Station.

Researchers who helped manage the development of the experiments will be on hand at Glenn's Visitor Center, which will be open until 7:30 p.m. on launch day. Visitors are invited to watch Endeavor's launch on the big screen in the Visitor Center auditorium.

Data acquired by SAME, one of the Glenn experiments flying on STS-118, will be used to design more effective smoke detectors for space exploration vehicles and non-terrestrial habitats, such as the moon or Mars. Because the consequences of a fire during space travel could be disastrous, scientists continue to study how smoke behaves in the environment of space. SAME is scheduled to return to Earth in February 2008.

The second experiment developed by Glenn that will fly to station on STS-118 is CSLM-2, a materials science experiment. Data gathered by this experiment will advance the development of new high-temperature materials, such as those used in nuclear propulsion and waste heat coolant processes. CSLM-2 will be operated on station until October of this year.

"These experiments show Glenn's continued work in investigating the unique environment of space and its effect on various processes that are essential for safe spaceflight," said Tom St. Onge, chief of Glenn's ISS and Human Research Project Office.

During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, Endeavour's crew will add another truss segment to the expanding station, install a new gyroscope and add an external spare parts platform. The flight will have at least three spacewalks. It also will debut a new system that enables docked shuttles to draw electrical power from the station to extend visits to the outpost. If this system functions as expected, three additional days will be added to the STS-118 mission.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Big plans for small satellites—testing laser communications, formation flying

Related Stories

Signs of ancient megatsunami could portend modern hazard

October 2, 2015

Scientists working off west Africa in the Cape Verde Islands have found evidence that the sudden collapse of a volcano there tens of thousands of years ago generated an ocean tsunami that dwarfed anything ever seen by humans. ...

Asteroids found to be the moon's main 'water supply'

October 1, 2015

Water reserves found on the moon are the result of asteroids acting as "delivery vehicles" and not of falling comets as was previously thought. Using computer simulation, scientists from MIPT and the RAS Geosphere Dynamics ...

Recommended for you

What happens when your brain can't tell which way is up?

October 13, 2015

In space, there is no "up" or "down." That can mess with the human brain and affect the way people move and think in space. An investigation on the International Space Station seeks to understand how the brain changes in ...

Hubble sees an aging star wave goodbye

October 12, 2015

This planetary nebula is called PK 329-02.2 and is located in the constellation of Norma in the southern sky. It is also sometimes referred to as Menzel 2, or Mz 2, named after the astronomer Donald Menzel who discovered ...

What are white holes?

October 9, 2015

Black holes are created when stars die catastrophically in a supernova. So what in the universe is a white hole?


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.