Study: Women are changing communication

July 11, 2007

A U.S. study suggests the academic discipline of communication -- once dominated by men at the university level -- is now the dominion of women.

University of Missouri-Columbia researchers examined the number of females publishing communication articles in four major academic journals during a 70-year period.

Professor Michael Kramer, chairman of the university's Department of Communication, and colleagues said their study is important because it highlights the demands of research productivity, which influences promotion and tenure decisions in communication departments nationwide. It also provides a microcosm of how academe standards change over a long period of time.

The researchers included Associate Professor Jon Hess and Professor emeritus Loren Reid. Reid, who is now 102, began publishing in communication journals in the 1930s.

Among other things, the study found that from the 1930s to the 1960s, there weren't many female authors. During the 70s and 80s there was a slight increase, and that trend continued during the 90s. Around 2000, articles by women authors began outnumbering those by men.

The research appears in the June/July issue of The Review of Communication.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Smaller and smarter antennas for military use

Related Stories

Smaller and smarter antennas for military use

July 24, 2015

When it comes to protecting the men and women of the armed forces, University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher Nader Behdad focuses his work on an obstacle most people wouldn't associate with combat: the physical limitations ...

Patent filings by women have risen fastest in academia

July 8, 2015

The number of women across the globe filing patents with the U.S. Patent and Trade Office over the past 40 years has risen fastest within academia compared to all other sectors of the innovation economy, according to a new ...

Recommended for you

French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

July 28, 2015

A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.