Scientists work to create nanogenerator

Jul 19, 2007

U.S. scientists are developing a nanogenerator -- a tiny device that produces electricity from flowing blood, pulsating blood vessels, or a beating heart.

Zhong Lin Wang and colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology said such a device could power implantable biomedical devices and other small electronics, as well as holding promise for biosensing, environmental monitoring and personal electronics.

The researchers said they have so far created a nanodevice that is able to generate electricity while immersed in biological fluids or other liquids, using ultrasonic waves as the energy source.

"It sets a solid foundation for self-powering implantable and wireless nanodevices and nanosystems in biofluid and any other type of liquid," Wang and colleagues said.

The research is reported in the Aug. 8 issue of the journal Nano Letters.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Turn that defect upside down: Twin boundaries in lithium-ion batteries

Related Stories

United States, China team explore energy harvesting

Apr 18, 2015

Six authors have described their work in harvesting energy in a paper titled "Ultrathin, Rollable, Paper-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Acoustic Energy Harvesting and Self-Powered Sound Recording." ...

Research that holds water

Jul 04, 2013

(Phys.org) —It's squishy, synthetic, flexible, mostly water and almost as tough as rubber. No, it's not "flubber"—it's a hydrogel, and now scientists at The University of Akron are exploring new biomedical ...

Photovoltaics from any semiconductor

Jul 26, 2012

A technology that would enable low-cost, high efficiency solar cells to be made from virtually any semiconductor material has been developed by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence ...

First self-powered device with wireless data transmission

Jun 15, 2011

Scientists are reporting development of the first self-powered nano-device that can transmit data wirelessly over long distances. In a study in ACS's journal Nano Letters, they say it proves the feasibility of a f ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.