Scientists work to control indoor mold

July 9, 2007

A U.S. research team has recommended various public policy guidelines that could be used to control indoor mold contamination in homes.

The study, conducted by Felicia Wu, Tom Biksey, Meryl Karol and colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh compared policies for regulation of mold with those previously developed to regulate two other indoor environmental contaminants -- radon and lead.

While federal, state, and local agencies have policies and regulations concerning radon and lead, few policies have been developed for mold and no federal agency has congressional authority to regulate or develop indoor mold policy, the study noted.

Based on lessons from radon and lead, the researchers recommend policy approaches for controlling indoor mold that rely on building and housing codes, maintenance and rehabilitation regulations, home marketing incentives, and public education on moisture and mold control.

"While it is not yet feasible to develop standards and regulations for acceptable mold levels in the home, guidelines and policies can be developed at the federal, state, and local levels to control moisture and mold in homes," the scientists said.

The study is to appear in the July 15 issue of the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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