NASA helps space crews breathe easier

Jul 17, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration successfully tested a new oxygen generating system aboard the International Space Station.

NASA said the system will allow the station's crew size to increase in 2009, augmenting the Russian Elektron oxygen generator.

With the increased capability to produce oxygen, NASA said the station can better support six crew members; the space station currently supports a three-person crew.

NASA said the system will generate about 12 pounds of oxygen per day -- enough for six people. However, it can provide as much as 20 pounds of oxygen daily -- enough for as many as 11 people.

"The successful activation and operation of this new system during its test run is an important step toward establishing a truly international space station," said Mike Suffredini, manager of NASA's space station program. "With this system's oxygen-generating capacity, we can expand the station's crew, providing more opportunities for our partner countries and unlocking more possibilities for research that will open new pathways for future exploration."

Currently, oxygen on the station comes from the Russian-built Elektron system, Russian supply vehicles, storage tanks in the U.S. Quest airlock and solid fuel oxygen generators.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA's reliance on outsourcing launches causes a dilemma for the space agency

Related Stories

ULA's new Vulcan rocket

Jun 24, 2015

Fierce commercial and international political pressures have forced the rapid development of the new Vulcan launcher family recently announced by rocket maker United Launch Alliance (ULA). Vulcan's "genesis" ...

How low can you orbit? (w/ Video)

Jun 12, 2015

The Earth's atmosphere is a total drag, especially if you're trying to orbit our planet. It's a drag. Get it? Atmospheric drag. Drag. Drag.

Recommended for you

New Horizons spacecraft experiences anomaly

3 hours ago

The New Horizons spacecraft experienced an anomaly the afternoon of July 4 that led to a loss of communication with Earth. Communication has since been reestablished and the spacecraft is healthy.

Dwarf planet Ceres offers big surprises for scientists

3 hours ago

The closer we get to Ceres, the more perplexing the dwarf planet grows. NASA's Dawn spacecraft has found several more bright spots as well as a pyramid-like peak jutting out of the frigid world's surface.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.