NASA Postpones Dawn Spacecraft Launch

July 5, 2007

Saturday's scheduled launch of NASA's Dawn spacecraft aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket has been postponed 24 hours.

A lightning advisory early Thursday interrupted fueling of the Delta II second stage rocket. Also, the temperature of the vehicle's second stage was too warm for the fueling process to begin. However, the fairing temperature has been lowered so that another attempt can be made Friday, July 6, pending acceptable weather.

Dawn's launch countdown dress rehearsal is now scheduled for Friday. The launch window on Sunday, July 8, extends from 4:04 p.m. to 4:33 p.m. EDT.

Weather for launch still may be an issue with a 60% chance of it not meeting launch criteria on Sunday.

The Dawn mission science briefing, scheduled for Friday, will be held as planned at 1 p.m. The pre-launch news conference is scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday, July 7, following the Launch Readiness Review.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Galileo pair preparing for December launch

Related Stories

Mission team ready for Galileo launch

September 7, 2015

When the next pair of Galileo satellites is boosted into orbit next Friday, a team of mission control experts in Darmstadt, Germany, will spring into action, working around the clock to bring the duo through their critical ...

First Dane in space begins long trip to repositioned ISS

September 2, 2015

The first Dane in space accompanied by 26 custom-made figurines from Danish toymaker Lego blasted off from Kazakhstan on Wednesday as part of a three-man team on an unusually long two-day mission to the International Space ...

Recommended for you

Earth might have hairy dark matter

November 23, 2015

The solar system might be a lot hairier than we thought. A new study publishing this week in the Astrophysical Journal by Gary Prézeau of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, proposes the existence of ...

Scientists detect stellar streams around Magellanic Clouds

November 23, 2015

(—Astronomers from the University of Cambridge, U.K., have detected a number of narrow streams and diffuse debris clouds around two nearby irregular dwarf galaxies called the Magellanic Clouds. The research also ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.