NASA listens to Apollo-era scientists

July 10, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans to celebrate the 38th anniversary of the first moon landing by reuniting retired scientists.

On July 20, more than a dozen retired members of the engineering team who worked on the Apollo-era spacecraft that carried astronauts to the moon will gather at NASA's Washington headquarters. The engineers will share lessons learned with current NASA employees in the Constellation Program, which will return astronauts to the moon by 2020.

The retired engineers -- former members of the Grumman Corp.'s Lunar Module Reliability and Maintainability Team -- will participate in technical discussions that will address such issues as testing, failure analysis and corrective action.

NASA officials said they want to build on the experiences of previous moon exploration experts in preparing for the return to the lunar surface.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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