New insecticide created for mosquitoes

July 18, 2007

French scientists have developed an effective insecticide-repellent compound that can be used against mosquitoes resistant to current chemicals.

The researchers at the Institute of Research for Development in Paris found that mosquitoes responsible for malaria transmission to humans are becoming resistant to pyrethroids used in spraying and to impregnate mosquito nets.

IRD researchers reported obtaining encouraging results by combining a non-pyrethroid insecticide, propoxur, and a repellent, N,N-diethyl toluamide, known as DEET. They found mosquito nets soaked with that mixture had a lethal power and irritant effect that inhibited the mosquitoes from biting. Moreover, the mosquitoes are paralyzed on contact with the mixture.

The scientists said mosquito mortality rates equaled those obtained by using deltamethrin, a commonly-used synthetic pyrethroid that's highly effective against mosquitoes.

The scientists said the efficacy of the mixtures opens a new pathway towards controlling pyrethroid-resistant malaria vectors. The researchers plan to test their method on mosquitoes resistant to two other types of insecticide utilized against malaria transmission: organophosphates and carbamates.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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