High-tech hockey uniform ready for use

July 3, 2007

A U.S. researcher has finished testing a new type of National Hockey League uniform designed to help players improve their game.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher Kim Blair was asked to test the new NHL uniform, designed and manufactured by Reebok USA. He subjected three prototypes and the old uniform to wind-resistance testing in MIT's powerful wind tunnel and supervised thermal testing at Central Michigan University.

The testing was designed to identify which prototype was lighter, less bulky and less prone to retaining moisture.

Blair said the old uniforms were big and bulky and the players were still wearing wool socks -- gear that gathered moisture and therefore weight as a game wore on. He said Reebok felt using state-of-the-art textiles and fabrication techniques would allow the athletes to perform at a higher level.

The Boston Bruins became the first team to show off the new outfit in June and it will be adopted by the rest of the league during the upcoming season.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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