Free day care planned at autism event

July 24, 2007

Some of the more than 2,000 people expected at Penn State University next week for the U.S. National Autism Conference will receive free daycare.

The conference -- one of the largest of its kind in the world -- started in 1998 with 300 attendees. Last year nearly 2,300 people attended the event from across the United States and even from Sweden.

This year's July 30-Aug. 3 conference is expected to again draw more than 2,000 people to the Penn State campus.

Autism affects about one in 150 U.S. children, making the condition more common than childhood cancer, cystic fibrosis and multiple sclerosis combined. Called Autism Spectrum Disorders, the neurobiological condition causes impairment in thinking, feeling, language and the ability to relate to others.

More information about the 2007 National Autism Conference is available at> online.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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