Congressman praises silver carp decision

July 11, 2007

U.S. Rep. Rahm Emanuel, D-Ill., is praising the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for adding silver carp to its list of injurious species.

Emanuel, in a statement Tuesday, said the rule finally recognizes the threat Asian Carp pose to lakes and rivers.

"The Great Lakes are a national treasure," said Emanuel. "Representing 95 percent of the United States' surface freshwater and providing drinking water to more than 30 million Americans, the Great Lakes are vital to the commercial, educational and recreational interests of millions of Americans and Canadians."

He said invasive species have long been a serious threat and noted the disastrous effects zebra mussels have had on Great Lakes water quality and water treatment facilities in Chicago.

"The silver carp could be an even more severe threat to the Great Lakes, endangering fisheries, ecosystems and even anglers," he said. "Today's decision ... is a breath of fresh air for the Great Lakes, and I will continue to work with my colleagues to make sure that other species of Asian Carp are included on the list."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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