Carbon dioxide plan reviewed in Washington

July 20, 2007

A California executive appeared before a Congressional committee in Washington to defend his unusual carbon dioxide reduction plans.

Appearing before a House Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming this week, Planktos chief executive Russ George detailed his company's plans to dump 80 tons of iron particles into the Pacific Ocean to stimulate carbon dioxide absorption, The Washington Post reported Friday.

The plans hinge on whether adding the iron to the water will adequately stimulate the growth of phytoplankton, known for its ability to absorb carbon dioxide from the air.

A number of environmental and scientific groups have openly opposed the unusual business venture, leading to George's appearance Wednesday.

Critics said the scientific endeavor could lead to negative environmental side effects and have asked Congress to regulate the carbon dioxide practice, the Post said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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