Russians blame NASA for computer failure

June 15, 2007
The International Space Station

Russian sources blame the United States for the failure of a key computer aboard the International Space Station, ABC News reported Friday.

When the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, set up the station's solar array it sent electromagnetic interference into the Russian computer, shutting it down, Russian sources told ABC News.

An unnamed source in the Russian space agency said there could be a "fatal flaw" with the station's main computer, ABC News reported.

U.S. and Russian space officials said the station could fly for a few months without correcting its flight, giving astronauts more time to work on the computer.

Meanwhile, U.S. astronauts James Reilly and Danny Olivas from the Space Shuttle Atlantis planned to climb out of the International Space Station Friday to secure a thermal blanket that peeled away during launch.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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