Aspirin resistant proteins are identified

Jun 26, 2007

Spanish scientists have identified blood proteins that might create aspirin resistance that keeps thousands of people from reaping aspirin's benefits.

Antonio Lopez-Farre, Carlos Macaya and colleagues at Clinico Hospital San Carlos in Madrid used a powerful technology called two-dimensional electrophoresis to study changes in different proteins present in two groups of patients with coronary artery disease, the underlying cause of most heart attacks.

One group of patients was aspirin-sensitive and the other had aspirin resistance.

The researchers found increased levels of three proteins involved in the binding of vitamin D in patients with aspirin resistance. They also demonstrated those proteins can inhibit aspirin's effects in preventing blood clots.

The researchers said their findings might aid in the development of more effective therapies for aspirin-resistant patients.

The study is scheduled for publication in the July 6 issue of the Journal of Proteome Research.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers learn to measure aging process in young adults

Related Stories

Some anti-inflammatory drugs affect more than their targets

Aug 21, 2014

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved ...

Curry spice could offer treatment hope for tendinitis

Aug 09, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A derivative of a common culinary spice found in Indian curries could offer a new treatment hope for sufferers of the painful condition tendinitis, an international team of researchers has shown.

Recommended for you

Researchers learn to measure aging process in young adults

3 minutes ago

Looking around at a 20th high school reunion, you might notice something puzzling about your classmates. Although they were all born within months of each other, these 38-year-olds appear to be aging at different ...

New paradigm for treating 'inflammaging' and cancer

4 hours ago

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.