As sharks dwindle, new laws enacted

May 28, 2007

Shark fisheries in Mexico and throughout the world are dealing with proposed rules to curb shark hunting in the interest of preserving these predators.

The Washington Post reported on the variety of new rules, which include Mexico's ban, enacted two weeks ago, on shark "finning" -- cutting off the animal's fins and throwing it back in the ocean to die. Shark fin soup is reportedly a delicacy and a status symbol enjoyed in Asian countries. The United States has taken measures in the interest of shark conservation, including legislation in 2000 making it illegal to possess a shark fin in U.S. waters without a corresponding carcass.

While an estimated four people per year suffer from shark attacks, the Post reported humans kill an estimated 26 million to 73 million sharks annually throughout the world, according to calculations by an international group of scientists.

But while more and more species of shark are being listed as threatened or endangered, those who hunt sharks are protesting new laws, saying it will hurt their means of making a living.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Cuban, US scientists bond over big sharks

Related Stories

Cuban, US scientists bond over big sharks

July 3, 2015

Somewhere in the North Atlantic right now, a longfin mako shark—a cousin of the storied great white—is cruising around, oblivious to the yellow satellite tag on its dorsal fin.

Recommended for you

A cataclysmic event of a certain age

July 27, 2015

At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago—give or take a few centuries—a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas.

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

July 28, 2015

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.