Maine Man Wins NASA's Glove Challenge

May 05, 2007

(AP) -- Coming up with a glove to be worn in the void of space is not a typical design challenge, but an engineer from Maine has impressed NASA with a design he came up with at his kitchen table. Peter Homer, 45, won $200,000 in NASA's "Astronaut Glove Challenge" at the New England Air Museum in Windsor Locks this week.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Image: Spirals in Saturn's D Ring

Related Stories

'Pick and mix' smart materials for robotics

1 hour ago

Researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a simple 'recipe' for combining multiple materials with single functions into a single material with multiple functions: movement, recall of movement ...

Study concludes that racehorses are getting faster

1 hour ago

Despite a general consensus among scientists and in the racing industry that racehorse speed has plateaued, a new study from the University of Exeter has found that racehorses are getting quicker. Further ...

Recommended for you

Early Titan was a cold, hostile place for life

3 hours ago

Titan is a mysterious orange-socked moon of Saturn that is exciting to astrobiologists because it has some of the same kinds of chemicals that were precursors to life on Earth. It also has a hydrological ...

Image: Spirals in Saturn's D Ring

4 hours ago

Although the D ring of Saturn is so thin that it's barely noticeable compared to the rest of the ring system, it still displays structures seen in other Saturnian rings. Here the spiral structures in the ...

Russian cosmonaut sets record for most time in space

4 hours ago

Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, who is the current commander of the International Space Station, has set a new record for most time spent in space, with a total of 803 days, Russian space agency said Tuesday.

Up, up and away, in the name of science education

21 hours ago

US researchers extol the virtues of high-altitude balloons for science education in a research paper published in the International Journal of Learning Technology. According to Jeremy Straub of the University of North Dakota ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.