U.S. electric vehicle research funded

May 23, 2007

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected five next-generation vehicle research projects to share in $19 million in government funding.

The projects are designed to further development of hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles. Combined with industry cost sharing, the selected projects will receive total funding of nearly $34 million, officials said.

The projects will focus on reducing the cost, weight and size of electric drive and power conversion devices, while increasing vehicle efficiency.

The winning projects were submitted by Delphi Automotive Systems in Troy, Mich.; Virginia Polytechnic Institute of Blacksburg, Va.; General Electric Global Research of Niskayuna, N.Y.; the General Motors Corp. in Torrance, Calif.; and the U.S. Hybrid Corp. of Torrance, Calif.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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