DEA demonstrates how to make meth

May 29, 2007

The Drug Enforcement Administration a held methamphetamine making seminar in Denver to demonstrate what its agents keep off the streets.

Agents Lisa Tennyson and Paul Levy demonstrated how meth cooks use simple household ingredients -- like striker plates from matchbooks, the guts of lithium batteries and drain cleaner -- to make the drug, The Denver Post reported.

"It's pretty gross," said Matt Leland, who works in career services at the University of Northern Colorado, and recently cooked the drug in a lab. "If someone was truly interested in manufacturing meth, it would not be that hard."

The class was held as part of the DEA's first Citizens Academy.

Some steps have been taken to make it harder for to create the drug. For example, Pseudoephedrine tablets are now kept behind counters and cannot be purchased in large amounts.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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