Study: Ads influence kids' drinking

May 3, 2007

U.S. researchers have determined children's exposure to alcohol advertising during early adolescence influences their later drinking habits.

The Rand Corp. study of sixth and seventh graders found those exposed to high levels of alcohol advertising -- including television, magazines, in-store displays and promotional items such as T-shirts and posters -- were 50 percent more likely to drink and 36 percent more likely to intend to drink than children exposed to very little alcohol advertising.

Previous studies found adolescents see at least 245 television ads for alcoholic beverages annually. The Rand study is unique in that it also asked adolescents about advertising in magazines, on radio and elsewhere.

"We did a previous study that found that children as young as fourth grade were very familiar with alcohol advertising and can tell you slogans and brand names," said Rebecca Collins, a Rand senior behavioral scientist and lead author of the research. "This new study shows that by the time they get to sixth grade, ads may be influencing them to drink."

The study is available online in the Journal of Adolescent Health and will appear in the journal's June print issue.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: New study supports link between alcohol advertising and adolescent drinking

Related Stories

Research shows not all low nicotine cigarettes reduce harm

June 15, 2016

Switching to reduced nicotine content (RNC) cigarettes may not necessarily reduce harm to smokers, according to new research conducted by Penn's Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Nicotine Addiction (CIRNA). Smokers ...

The history (and health claims) of the tea

June 9, 2016

How do you take your tea – with a drop of poisonous chemicals or a spoonful of sheep dung? Throughout history, the health benefits – and harms – of this popular beverage have been widely debated. In an article originally ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Cow embryos reveal new type of chromosome chimera

May 27, 2016

I've often wondered what happens between the time an egg is fertilized and the time the ball of cells that it becomes nestles into the uterine lining. It's a period that we know very little about, a black box of developmental ...

Shaving time to test antidotes for nerve agents

February 29, 2016

Imagine you wanted to know how much energy it took to bike up a mountain, but couldn't finish the ride to the peak yourself. So, to get the total energy required, you and a team of friends strap energy meters to your bikes ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.