IT Workers Less Confident About Jobs, Finances

April 7, 2007

While national worker confidence grew, the feelings of IT professionals about their jobs, finances and the economy slipped in March, finds a new report.

Anticipating a hiring slow-down and expressing malcontent in their work, IT worker confidence slipped in March, finds an index released April 4 by New York-based staffing company Hudson.

Hudson's IT worker confidence index came in at 109.7 in March, down 2.6 points from February, and down 5.3 points from March 2006.

Down from 36 percent in February, only 31 percent of IT workers believed their companies would be hiring in the coming months, hinting at a looming technology slow-down. However, the number of workers who expected their companies to have layoffs was down from the previous month to 21 percent.

Furthermore, IT workers were less preoccupied in March with losing their jobs than they were in February, at 18 percent versus 21 percent.

Yet, the technology workforce were less happy with their jobs in March than they were in February, falling from 74 percent to 70 percent.

The over five-point slide in IT worker confidence came in contrast to that of Hudson's national index of all workers, across fields and professions, which gained nearly two points in March. The March 2007 measure came in three points higher than that of March 2006.

Workers nationally expressed improved sentiment regarding their personal finances and job satisfaction. Up two points from February, the number of workers who rated their finances as "good" or "excellent" climbed to 46 percent.

Three-quarters of the workforce indicated that they were happy with their jobs, up one point from February.

"Despite some recent worrisome news regarding the economy, particularly in the housing sector, U.S. workers remain upbeat about the job market," said Robert Morgan, president of Hudson Talent Management. "Instead, low unemployment and steady, albeit somewhat slower, job growth are established trends that can help explain why most of the work force seems undeterred by bad news."

Confidence among all managers slipped in March due to weakened sentiment relating to their finances. Specifically, the number who indicated their financial situation was improving fell three points to 49 percent, while there was a four-point jump in the number who said it was getting worse.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Study finds people with Ebola may not always show symptoms

Related Stories

Study finds people with Ebola may not always show symptoms

November 15, 2016

A year after the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine and other institutions identified 14 individuals previously unknown to have had the disease in a Sierra Leone village ...

Immunotherapy a hot topic in treating cancers

September 15, 2016

Last Friday was Rebecca Hertzog Burns' birthday. She turned 2. She says that's her age, though she's really 27. After a relapse in her fight with acute myelogenous leukemia, Burns received a stem cell transplant on Sept. ...

T-Mobile cutting a net 1,900 call-center jobs

March 22, 2012

(AP) -- Cellphone carrier T-Mobile USA Inc. said Thursday that it is cutting 1,900 jobs nationwide as it consolidates its call centers in an effort to reduce costs and remain competitive.

Obama calls for effort to boost high-tech training, hiring

March 9, 2015

Targeting stagnant wages in an otherwise improving economy, President Barack Obama on Monday called on employers, educational institutions and local governments to develop a home grown high technology workforce that could ...

Recommended for you

Samsung to disable Note 7 phones in recall effort

December 9, 2016

Samsung announced Friday it would disable its Galaxy Note 7 smartphones in the US market to force remaining owners to stop using the devices, which were recalled for safety reasons.

Swiss unveil stratospheric solar plane

December 7, 2016

Just months after two Swiss pilots completed a historic round-the-world trip in a Sun-powered plane, another Swiss adventurer on Wednesday unveiled a solar plane aimed at reaching the stratosphere.

Solar panels repay their energy 'debt': study

December 6, 2016

The climate-friendly electricity generated by solar panels in the past 40 years has all but cancelled out the polluting energy used to produce them, a study said Tuesday.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.