Scientist find chemical to stop anthrax

April 21, 2007

A U.S. research team has identified a chemical that could be effective against anthrax.

A report published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry says a team from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, and University of Nevada-Las Vegas have identified seven chemicals that block the germination of cultured anthrax spores.

The researchers showed that one of the compounds, 6-thioguanosine, blocked the spores' germination inside mammalian cells -- thus blocking anthrax infection, the journal said Friday in a release. The scientists are planning to test 6-thioguanosine in mice infected with the anthrax bacterium.

Anthrax is a disease caused by spores that germinate into bacteria, which then release a deadly toxin.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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