Study: Red meat raises breast cancer risk

April 4, 2007

A British study suggested that consuming even small portions of red meat can increase the risk of breast cancer in older woman by 56 percent.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Leeds, found that women who consumed as little as 2 ounces of red beef, lamb or pork a day experienced a higher level of risk and post-menopausal women who ate at least 3.6 ounces of processed meats daily had an increased risk of 64 percent, The Telegraph reported Wednesday.

The research involved 35,000 women between the ages of 35 and 69 who were observed over the course of eight years.

The researchers said their findings were adjusted to take into account smoking, weight, fruit and vegetable intake, class, education and hormone replacement therapy.

"The findings are robust. Whatever we adjusted the data for we could still find an association," said lead researcher Janet Cade. "Women consuming the most total meat, red meat and processed meat were at the highest risk compared with non-meat eaters, although red and processed meat were only statistically significant post-menopausally."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Choosing healthier protein-rich foods instead of red and processed meats may reduce heart disease

Related Stories

First invasive lionfish discovered in Brazil

April 22, 2015

A single fish caught with a hand spear off the Brazilian coast is making big waves across the entire southwestern Atlantic. In May 2014, a group of recreational divers spotted an adult lionfish—the voracious invader Pterois ...

Ethiopia's 'Iron Lion Zion' cats fading fast

March 10, 2015

Ethiopia's black-maned lions once represented a former emperor, "Lion of Judah" Haile Selassie, and were immortalised in a song by reggae legend Bob Marley. Today, they struggle for survival.

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.