Study: Red meat raises breast cancer risk

April 4, 2007

A British study suggested that consuming even small portions of red meat can increase the risk of breast cancer in older woman by 56 percent.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Leeds, found that women who consumed as little as 2 ounces of red beef, lamb or pork a day experienced a higher level of risk and post-menopausal women who ate at least 3.6 ounces of processed meats daily had an increased risk of 64 percent, The Telegraph reported Wednesday.

The research involved 35,000 women between the ages of 35 and 69 who were observed over the course of eight years.

The researchers said their findings were adjusted to take into account smoking, weight, fruit and vegetable intake, class, education and hormone replacement therapy.

"The findings are robust. Whatever we adjusted the data for we could still find an association," said lead researcher Janet Cade. "Women consuming the most total meat, red meat and processed meat were at the highest risk compared with non-meat eaters, although red and processed meat were only statistically significant post-menopausally."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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