NASA extends its Russian space contract

April 10, 2007

NASA has signed a $719 million extension of the International Space Station contract with Russia's Federal Space Agency for services through 2011.

The extension covers crew rotations for 15 crew members, six in 2009, six in 2010 and three in 2011, as well as the delivery and removal of 5.6 metric tons of cargo. U.S. commercial orbital transportation services are still planned to provide the bulk of cargo transportation needs from 2010 and beyond to the space station.

With the modification, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration also is purchasing the capability for Russian spacecraft to carry 1.4 metric tons of NASA cargo to the space station beginning in 2010.

The contract covers work performed in Russia and Kazakhstan, on board the International Space Station, at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, and at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: SpaceX chief envisions 1,000 passenger ships flying to Mars

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Scientists investigate unidentified radio sources

September 28, 2016

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers led by Andrea Maselli of the Institute of Space Astrophysics and Cosmic Physics of Palermo, Italy, has conducted an observational campaign of a group of unassociated radio sources with NASA's ...

The frontier fields: Where primordial galaxies lurk

September 28, 2016

In the ongoing hunt for the universe's earliest galaxies, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has wrapped up its observations for the Frontier Fields project. This ambitious project has combined the power of all three of NASA's ...

Research resolves a debate over 'killer electrons' in space

September 28, 2016

New findings by a UCLA-led international team of researchers answer a fundamental question about our space environment and will help scientists develop methods to protect valuable telecommunication and navigation satellites. ...

Kepler watched a Cepheid star boil

September 28, 2016

After four years of continuous monitoring, astronomers detected clear signs of convective cells in a giant pulsating star for the first time using the Kepler space telescope.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.