Japan drafts rules for advanced robots

April 6, 2007

The Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry has drafted guidelines designed to keep future generations of robots on their best behavior.

The document, titled "Draft Guidelines to Secure the Safe Performance of Next Generation Robots," calls for the Japanese government to convene a panel of industrialists, academics, ministry officials and lawyers to create stricter measures governing the development of advanced robotic machines, The Times of London reported Friday.

The document is designed to prevent risks to humans in a world where robots may soon be used for cleaning, cooking and other tasks.

"Risk shall be defined as a combination of the occurrence rate of danger and the actual level of danger," the document states.

"Risk estimation involves estimating the potential level of danger and evaluating the potential sources of danger. Therefore total risk is defined as the danger of use of robots and potential sources of danger."

The draft calls for all advanced robots to be equipped with a logging system for cataloging injuries they cause to humans.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: The sun

Related Stories

The sun

September 28, 2015

The sun is the center of the Solar System and the source of all life and energy here on Earth. It accounts for more than 99.86% of the mass of the Solar System and it's gravity dominates all the planets and objects that orbit ...

Will Americans accept self-driving cars?

October 8, 2014

Just before the turn of the 20th century, a new and frightening technology was introduced to the American public. These "horseless carriages"—as the first motorized vehicles were called—were deemed loud, dirty, and dangerous, ...

Robots learning to work with humans

April 2, 2014

With the advent of "inherently safe" robots, industrial designers are changing their ideas about the factory of the future. Robots such as ABB's Frida and the Baxter robot from MIT spinoff Rethink Robotics are working "elbow ...

The promise and peril of nanotechnology

March 26, 2014

Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to detect metastatic breast cancer by arranging strands of DNA into spherical shapes and using them to cover a tiny particle of gold, creating a "nano-flare" that lights ...

Recommended for you

Dutch create world's largest man-made wave

October 5, 2015

In a country where most people live below sea level, studying the oceans is a matter of survival. Now Dutch scientists have created the world's biggest man-made wave in a bid to prepare for the worst.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.