Study focuses on prescription addiction

Apr 23, 2007

Researchers at the University of California-San Francisco have started a study to evaluate treatments for addiction to prescription painkillers.

The research is the first large-scale study designed to assess whether addiction to opioid painkillers, such as Vicodin and OxyContin, can effectively be treated with drug treatments currently used for heroin addiction.

The study -- part of a national effort involving 11 clinical research centers -- is in response to increasing incidents of prescription drug abuse, said to Dr. Stephen Dominy of the San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center, who is co-leading the University of California-San Francisco portion of the study.

"The abuse of prescription opiates has become a very serious problem in our society but, until now, there have been no large-scale studies to evaluate how to treat those addictions," Dominy said. "This study hopes to assess whether current opiate dependence therapies are effective, as well as the role of counseling in treatment outcomes."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Re-engineered antibiotic shows potential for treatment of drug-resistant bacteria

Related Stories

Study: More can be done more to help smokers quit

Jun 15, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Many healthcare providers are quick to advise patients to quit smoking, but few follow up with programs, plans or prescriptions to help them break the habit, new research from UC Davis has found.

AMD drug and IOP; getting good eyeglasses to those in need

Oct 26, 2009

A first-time finding of intraocular pressure increases in patients with no personal or family history of glaucoma following anti-VEGF treatment for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and a report on a simple, low-cost ...

Recommended for you

US appeals court upholds delay in Alzheimer's drug swap

6 hours ago

A federal appeals court has rejected a drug manufacturer's appeal and affirmed a judge's order that Actavis PLC keep distributing its widely used Alzheimer's medication until after its patent expires this summer.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.