Lose a Phone? YouGetItBack Will Help Get It Back

March 28, 2007

On Monday, lost-and-found service Yougetitback.com announced a new electronic e-tagging system for lost cell phones and PDAs at CTIA.

Designed to help customers retrieve their missing portable devices, the new e-tag service will reside on a user's cell phone as an application, according to the company, and prevent anyone but the phone's owner from making calls if it is misplaced or stolen.

What's more, the service also provides a denial of service, remote delete, data backup and recovery, and guaranteed replacement functions for customers who use e-tagging. The company will store any critical information a customer has on his or her phone, and if it isn't returned, transfer that data to a new phone.

According to a Yougetitback representative, the service is based on Java technology and will work with any phone and all types of operating systems. If a cell phone is lost, users will be able to log onto Yougetitback's Web site and activate the e-tag wallpaper on their device. Once that's done, only the wallpaper will be displayed on the phone's screen. Additionally, anyone who finds the phone will only be able to make outgoing calls to the Yougetitback call center.

As an added incentive for those who find a missing phone or PDA, the company also doles out a small $20 reward to those who return the device.

Yougetitback.com is the brainchild of Frank Hannigan, now the chief executive of the company. First launched overseas, with services here in the U.S. as of late February, the tagging service also expands beyond cell phones and PDAs and covers all manner of electronic gadgetry, such as iPods, notebooks, even car keys.

The company is now trying to pair its service with other mobile carriers here in the U.S. as an added incentive to people signing up for service. According to the company, if a lost item is not returned, Yougetitback will offer an optional replacement program as well.

Yougetitback.com currently offers its lost-and-found services worldwide, and has offices in Ireland, the UK, Dubai, and the U.S., according to the company. Its e-tagging service will be available to mobile carriers here in the U.S. starting in April and for everyday customers shortly thereafter. The price for individuals is a one-time fee of $9.99 for three years of service.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

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