Wolves remain elusive in lower Michigan

March 30, 2007

Michigan wildlife officials said they are convinced there are gray wolves in the Lower Peninsula even though no one has spotted a pack.

Wildlife biologists with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources have been looking into reports of wolf sightings in Lower Michigan for three years without turning up evidence of a pack.

The DNR received 219 reports of wolf sightings in the Lower Peninsula last year and officials say at least a few wolves are probably roaming the woods, the Traverse City (Mich.) Record-Eagle reported.

"They are here, probably in small numbers, and are staying away from people," wildlife biologist Brian Mastenbrook told the newspaper.

More than 400 wolves live in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, which is separated from the rest of the state by the Straits of Mackinac.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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