NASA seeks new research proposals

March 27, 2007

NASA said it is seeking research proposals for its Next Generation Air Traffic Management Airspace and Subsonic Fixed Wing projects.

The primary goal of the Airspace Systems Program is to develop revolutionary concepts, capabilities and technologies that will enable significant increases in the capacity, efficiency and flexibility of the U.S. National Airspace System.

A major focus of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Subsonic Fixed Wing project is to develop technologies for future subsonic aircraft with lower noise, lower emissions and higher performance.

NASA said it is interested in improving both conventional and unconventional configurations to meet those goals.

Officials said they expect educational institutions, non-profit organizations and industry engaged in foundational research will be the primary award recipients.

Specific evaluation criteria, deadlines and points of contact for the research projects are available at nspires.nasaprs.com

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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