Lack of sleep leaving women stressed

March 7, 2007

A new survey says more than 60 percent of U.S. women have trouble getting a good night's sleep.

The lack of sleep leaves many women stressed out, too tired for sex and with too little time for their friends, the poll by the National Sleep Foundation said.

Seventy-two percent of working mothers and 68 percent of single working women reported sleep problems like insomnia. The highest level of sleep problems was reported by stay-at-home mothers, with 74 percent reporting symptoms of insomnia at least a few nights each week.

"Women of all ages are burning the candle at both ends and as a result they are sleepless and stressed out," NSF chief executive Richard L. Gelula said in a release.

When pressed for time, one-half of the women polled responded that sleep and exercise are the first things they sacrifice. The next things to go are time with friends and family, healthy eating and sexual activity.

Only 20 percent of women said they put work on the back burner when they run out of time or are too sleepy, the report said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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