S. Korean scientists want android to walk

Mar 23, 2007

South Korean scientists are trying to develop a walking android without making its legs so thick that it would no longer look like a human.

"It is relatively easy to make humanoids walk because they don't have to resemble humans, but things are different for androids intended to look human," a researcher at the Korean Institute of Technology told the Korea Times.

EveR-2, nicknamed Muse, is technically a gynoid, an android designed to look like a young Korean woman. Last year, EveR-2 demonstrated an ability to sing.

Researchers are split on how quickly a walking android can be developed. Institute researchers hope for victory this year or next, but other scientists say that walking could be a decade or more away.

Oh Jun-ho of the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology made the first humanoid to move with a natural gait, Hubo.

"Humanoid researchers tend to think it is not a big deal to make a robot walk. In fact, it is a big deal,'' he said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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