IBM Announces Production of Cell Chip at 65nm

March 12, 2007

IBM announced today that the company has begun producing a new, 65 nanometer version of the Cell Broadband Engine at IBM's state-of-the-art East Fishkill, New York microchip production facility.

The revolutionary Cell chip, jointly developed by IBM, Sony Group and Toshiba, is effectively a supercomputer-on-a-chip, providing breakthrough performance for consumer electronics, medical imaging, design engineering and other graphics-intensive applications. In addition to serving as the digital heartbeat of Sony Computer Entertainment’s Playstation 3, the chip also appears in IBM’s BladeCenter servers.

A team of computer scientists from IBM, Sony Group and Toshiba has collaborated on the development of the Cell microprocessor at a joint design center established in Austin, Texas, since March 2001.

Source: IBM

Explore further: IBM, Sony and Toshiba Unveil Details of the Cell Microprocessor

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