England says stop supersizing

March 28, 2007

British health regulators are encouraging snack makers to market smaller candy bars and chip packages to help residents slim down.

The smaller portion proposal is among proposals from the British Food Standards Agency for encouraging healthier eating, The Telegraph reported.

Smaller packages are available but are usually part of multi-packs and cost more, the agency said.

The agency also proposed that food manufacturers cut foods' saturated fat and calorie content, make low-fat alternatives more available and increase the public's understanding of the connection between saturated fat and health, The Telegraph reported.

"Many leading food manufacturers and retailers have already taken action to provide healthier food choices for consumers. Over the past three years we have seen reductions in the levels of salt as well as lower-fat ranges of products. We are keen to find out what more could be done," Gill Fine, the director of nutrition and dietary health at the agency, said in The Telegraph.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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