Beetle species rediscovered in Britain

Mar 19, 2007

The endangered short-necked oil beetle, long thought gone from Britain, was rediscovered recently by an entomologist at a site in southern county of Devon.

Marking the first time the beetle species has been found alive in Britain since 1948, amateur entomologist Bob Heckford recently found the insects on the remote grasslands site owned by the National Trust, The Independent reported.

Experts said that the steep slope of the site likely helped the beetle species, Meloe brevicollis, survive the massive agricultural movement that had nearly wiped it out since World War II.

"It's likely that this population of the short-necked oil beetle has survived because they inhabit an area of land that has avoided the intensive farming methods of surrounding arable land," said David Bullock, a nature conservationist with the National Trust.

"It's great that this oil beetle, with its fascinating lifestyle, has survived against all the odds and is back in business on the south Devon coast," he added.

In response to the discovery, the National Trust is working with the tenant farmer to ensure the beetles' safety.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers discover new mechanism of DNA repair

Related Stories

'Jaws' lived in Doncaster according to fossil record

Sep 15, 2014

(Phys.org) —Sharks, swamps and a tropical rainforest teeming with life – it's not what comes to mind when you think of Yorkshire. But for the first time evidence of Doncaster's 310-million-year-old past, ...

Recommended for you

Researchers discover new mechanism of DNA repair

5 hours ago

The DNA molecule is chemically unstable giving rise to DNA lesions of different nature. That is why DNA damage detection, signaling and repair, collectively known as the DNA damage response, are needed.

The math of shark skin

13 hours ago

"Sharks are almost perfectly evolved animals. We can learn a lot from studying them," says Emory mathematician Alessandro Veneziani.

Cuban, US scientists bond over big sharks

17 hours ago

Somewhere in the North Atlantic right now, a longfin mako shark—a cousin of the storied great white—is cruising around, oblivious to the yellow satellite tag on its dorsal fin.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.