Wis. tunnel fix could dump sewage in water

Feb 05, 2007

Milwaukee officials warn that a court order to line a deep tunnel with concrete could cause sewage to dump into the city's rivers and Lake Michigan.

State and local officials say Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Jean DiMotto's ruling that the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District must install the concrete lining in the one-mile stretch of tunnel to stop groundwater from seeping into the tunnel could force the entire tunnel system to be shut down for a year or more.

"There are no controls to shut off one leg or the other. It was designed to operate as a single unit," said Chuck Burney, a Department of Natural Resources special assistant assigned to monitor MMSD sewage overflows. "It is either in service or out of service."

Proponents of the order say the seepage has lowered the water table beneath downtown Milwaukee, causing old wood pilings beneath some buildings to rot when exposed to air.

"We are pleased with the court's ruling," said Rick White, a spokesman for Wisconsin Energy.

"We believe the damage is continuing and this order would stop that," White said. "Lining the tunnel would solve the problem."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: This has been a month of extreme weather around the world

Related Stories

Galapagos volcano calms, pink iguanas out of danger

35 minutes ago

A volcano in the Galapagos Islands whose fiery eruption raised fears for the world's only population of pink iguanas has calmed, sparing the unique critters from danger, officials said Tuesday.

On-demand X-rays at synchrotron light sources

49 minutes ago

Consumers are now in the era of "on-demand" entertainment, in which they have access to the books, music and movies they want thanks to the internet. Likewise, scientists who use synchrotron light sources ...

New chip makes testing for antibiotic-resistant bacteria faster, easier

55 minutes ago

We live in fear of 'superbugs': infectious bacteria that don't respond to treatment by antibiotics, and can turn a routine hospital stay into a nightmare. A 2015 Health Canada report estimates that superbugs have already cost Canadians $1 billion, and are a "serious and growing issue." Each year two million people in the U.S. contract antibiotic-re ...

Recommended for you

EPA says first day of oil spill spent 'planning'

5 hours ago

On the afternoon of the largest coastal oil spill in California in 25 years, graduate student Natalie Phares quickly organized a volunteer bucket brigade to clean a beach north of Santa Barbara.

Great Barrier Reef stays on UN watch list

12 hours ago

The Great Barrier Reef will remain under surveillance but not be listed as endangered, according to a draft recommendation to the UN's World Heritage Committee, published on Friday.

Food or fuel? How about both?

16 hours ago

In the United States, federal mandates to produce more renewable fuels, especially biofuels, have led to a growing debate: Should fuel or food grow on arable land? Recent research shows farmers can successfully, ...

Using desalination to address drought

16 hours ago

"It's a very interesting time in the water industry," says Carlos Riva '75, CEO of Poseidon Water, a company that is drawing attention as it develops, in Southern California, what will be the largest seawater ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.