Nicotine gum warnings scaring away smokers

February 28, 2007

Some public-health experts are urging U.S. food and drug officials to tone down the warning labels on nicotine medicines.

They say nicotine gums, patches and lozenges products carry so many warnings that smokers are reluctant to use them, The Wall Street Journal reported.

The newspaper said public-health experts may recommend relaxing health warnings for pregnant women and eliminating the requirement that teenagers get the approval of a physician for over-the-counter nicotine medicines.

"A 17-year-old smoker of 25 cigarettes per day is doing the right thing to use nicotine gum," says Jonathan Foulds, a tobacco researcher at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. "Why give him another hurdle to cross to get help?"

Critics urge caution in making any changes to current labeling.

"The use of nicotine, whose efficacy in treating nicotine addiction is controversial even in adults, must be strictly avoided in pregnancy, breastfeeding, childhood and adolescence," eight researchers and anti-smoking advocates said in an editorial in the current Journal of Health Psychology.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: No butts: Paris stiffens fine for smokers who throw stubs in street

Related Stories

Medicare expands coverage to help smokers quit

August 28, 2010

(AP) -- Even though they've lived with the health warnings much of their lives and doubtless seen the ill effects on friends, relatives and even themselves, about 4.5 million older Americans continue to smoke.

Bees survival: Ban more pesticides?

May 3, 2013

Neonicotinoids are under intense scrutiny. But a ban of a broad variety of pesticides may be required to protect bees, humans and the environment.

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.