Mud Tomb Found Near Oldest Egypt Pyramid

Feb 19, 2007
Mud Tomb Found Near Oldest Egypt Pyramid (AP)
This undated photo released by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities Monday, Feb. 19, 2006 shows an artifact from a recently discovered mud brick tomb dating back to the late fifth dynasty and early sixth dynasty which was found at the Teti necropolis located to the northern side of Teti pyramid in Saqqara, Egypt. The tomb, which was found by an Egyptian-Australian mission, belonged to Ka-Hay, who kept divine records, and his wife, according to Zahi Hawass, Egypt's antiquities chief. (AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities)

(AP) -- A mud brick tomb dating back more than 4,000 years has been discovered near Egypt's most ancient pyramid in the Saqqara complex south of Cairo, antiquities official announced Monday. The tomb, which was found by an Egyptian-Australian mission, belonged to Ka-Hay, who kept divine records, and his wife, said Zahi Hawass, Egypt's antiquities chief.



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