Europe cell phone study focuses on tumors

January 25, 2007

A European study suggests people using cell phones for 10 or more years have a higher risk of developing brain tumors than do non-cell phone users.

The five-nation study involving more than 4,500 people found a statistically significant increase in the incidence of tumors on the side of the head where the users hold their cell phones, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported.

"Although our results overall do not indicate an increased risk of glioma in relation to mobile phone use, the possible risk in the most heavily exposed part of the brain with long-term use needs to be explored further before firm conclusions can be drawn," the researchers said.

The study covering the United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland is to be published next month in the International Journal of Cancer.

The research is part of a larger 13-nation research program coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, the newspaper reported. Results from all 13 countries are expected to be analyzed and made public later this year. The United States is not included in the research.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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