China world's e-waste dump site

January 9, 2007

China is the world's dump for electronic waste with about 70 percent of the industry's material smuggled into the country, a Chinese scientist said.

State Environmental Protection Administration researcher Hu Tao said some of the waste is shipped to inland provinces of China from the costal communities where processing plants are located, China Radio International said Tuesday. If the government doesn't intervene, the shipment to interior provinces will increase, he said.

SEPA researchers said they found coastal plants use outdated techniques to melt metals from circuit board and to separate electronic components. The process discharges untreated toxic liquids into the environment.

The Basel Convention, adopted in 1989, bans countries from transporting hazardous wastes across boundaries for disposal, especially into developing countries. Tao said a number of countries did not sign the treaty, so the dumping has been able to continue.

SEPA urged government departments, especially customs, to step up law enforcement and punishments to curb more electronic waste from being dumped in China.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: When eating fish is a health hazard

Related Stories

When eating fish is a health hazard

September 14, 2015

Fish farmed or caught near the world's great industrial growth areas run the risk of spreading toxic contamination up the food chain and poisoning consumers.

German researchers using plants to mine germanium

September 9, 2015

A team of researchers at Germany's Freiburg University of Mining and Technology has found a new way to get germanium (which was first discovered in that country and used in early transistors), according to a report from Reuters—they ...

Where is solar power headed?

July 22, 2015

Most experts agree that to have a shot at curbing the worst impacts of climate change, we need to extricate our society from fossil fuels and ramp up our use of renewable energy.

Recommended for you

Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' happen?

October 9, 2015

A researcher from the University of Southampton has produced a scientific study of the climate scenario featured in the disaster movie 'The Day After Tomorrow'.

Image: Sentinel-1A captures Azore islands

October 9, 2015

This Sentinel-1A radar image was processed to depict water in blue and land in earthen colours. It features some of the Azore islands about 1600 km west of Lisbon, including the turtle-shaped Faial, the dagger-like Sao Jorge ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.