UI licenses flex electronics technology

December 19, 2006

The University of Illinois-Champaign has signed a licensing agreement regarding the development of flexible, stretchable and printable electronic circuitry.

The agreement with Semprius Inc., the university said, heralds what might be a world-changing technology in flexible circuitry.

The new technology is the result of research by two University of Illinois professors of materials science, engineering and chemistry -- Ralph Nuzzo and John Rogers -- providing the groundwork for a platform technology that is designed to enable multiple applications across diverse markets.

Semprius is preparing to make large-scale, high-performance flexible and stretchable electronic circuits that can be applied to any surface. Among other things, the process can reportedly even produce rubber gloves with built-in sensors that could be used by surgeons.

The fabrication technology -- developed by Rogers, the company's president and co-founder -- uses a two-step process: First, electronic devices are formed on a semiconductor wafer using conventional techniques, then an extremely thin layer that contains the complete transistor is lifted from the wafer and printed onto nearly any material, including plastic, glass, metal or other semiconductors.

The company's motto is "High Performance Semiconductors Anywhere."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Turning clothing into information displays

Related Stories

Turning clothing into information displays

September 2, 2015

Researchers from Holst Centre (set up by TNO and imec), imec and CMST, imec's associated lab at Ghent University, have demonstrated the world's first stretchable and conformable thin-film transistor (TFT) driven LED display ...

Magnetic fields provide a new way to communicate wirelessly

September 1, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a new wireless communication technique that works by sending magnetic signals through the human body. The new technology could offer a lower power ...

Pentagon funding new high-tech venture

August 28, 2015

Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced Friday that the Pentagon is funding a new venture to develop cutting-edge electronics and sensors that can flex and stretch and could be built into clothing or the skins of ships and ...

Recommended for you

Team develops targeted drug delivery to lung

September 2, 2015

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have developed a new method that can target delivery of very small volumes of drugs into the lung. Their approach, in which micro-liters ...

Not another new phone! But Nextbit's Robin is smarter

September 2, 2015

San Francisco-based Nextbit wants you to meet Robin, which they consider as the smarter smartphone. Their premise is that no one is making a smart smartphone; when you get so big it's hard to see the forest through the trees. ...

Team creates functional ultrathin solar cells

August 27, 2015

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Johannes Kepler University Linz in Austria has developed an ultrathin solar cell for use in lightweight and flexible applications. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, ...

Smart home heating and cooling

August 28, 2015

Smart temperature-control devices—such as thermostats that learn and adjust to pre-programmed temperatures—are poised to increase comfort and save energy in homes.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.