Science group posts interactive Web site

December 22, 2006

The San Francisco-based Public Library of Science says its online journal will post research and allow interactive review before and after publication.

The non-profit organization said the goal of PLoS ONE was to make scientific and medical literature a public resource. The organization's officials said they studied current scientific and medical publishing before developing the Internet site. To avoid a static user experience, PLoS ONE includes peer-review strategy, the production workflow, the author experience, the user interface and the software that provides the publishing platform, the organization said in a news release.

"This is the moment when we seize the full potential of the Internet to make communication of research findings an interactive and fully accessible process that gives greater value to what we do as scientists," said Harold Varmus, PLoS co-founder and board chairman and president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

The articles posted to PLoS ONE have been peer-reviewed under the guidance of an academic editorial board, Varmus said. Because the articles are published under an open access license, they are free.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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