Science group posts interactive Web site

December 22, 2006

The San Francisco-based Public Library of Science says its online journal will post research and allow interactive review before and after publication.

The non-profit organization said the goal of PLoS ONE was to make scientific and medical literature a public resource. The organization's officials said they studied current scientific and medical publishing before developing the Internet site. To avoid a static user experience, PLoS ONE includes peer-review strategy, the production workflow, the author experience, the user interface and the software that provides the publishing platform, the organization said in a news release.

"This is the moment when we seize the full potential of the Internet to make communication of research findings an interactive and fully accessible process that gives greater value to what we do as scientists," said Harold Varmus, PLoS co-founder and board chairman and president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

The articles posted to PLoS ONE have been peer-reviewed under the guidance of an academic editorial board, Varmus said. Because the articles are published under an open access license, they are free.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: All eyes on the oceans—James Hansen and sea level rise

Related Stories

All eyes on the oceans—James Hansen and sea level rise

September 1, 2015

On July 23, James Hansen and 16 co-authors posted a discussion paper on an open-review website about sea level rise and climate change. The article has garnered massive attention around the internet and scientific communities — both ...

There may be a complex market living in your gut

August 1, 2015

Conventional theories used by economists for the past 150 years to explain how societies buy, sell, and trade goods and services may be able to unlock mysteries about the behavior of microbial life on earth, according to ...

Recommended for you

Early human diet explains our eating habits

August 31, 2015

Much attention is being given to what people ate in the distant past as a guide to what we should eat today. Advocates of the claimed palaeodiet recommend that we should avoid carbohydrates and load our plates with red meat ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.