Minority group materials scientists sought

Dec 19, 2006

A group of U.S. nanomaterials scientists in Maryland is starting a program designed to attract and train materials scientists from minority groups.

The scientists at Johns Hopkins and Howard universities, along with Prince George's Community College, have created the "Partnership for Research and Education in Materials" to involve undergraduates in world-class research on the properties of nanomaterials.

"The goal is for this partnership to increase the number of minorities who pursue careers in materials research, engineering and related fields, including physics and chemistry," said Johns Hopkins Professor Daniel Reich. "We'll do this on several levels, all of which include the sharing of our resources -- both intellectual and in terms of research infrastructure -- with those at the other institutions."

PREM will receive $2.75 million during a 5-year period and is one of six new such partnerships receiving a total of $15.4 million from the National Science Foundation.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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