ISS crew stows items brought by Discovery

December 30, 2006

International Space Station residents spent the week processing more than two tons of materials left by the space shuttle Discovery, U.S. officials said.

After taking Christmas Day off, commander Mike Lopez-Alegria and flight engineers Mikhail Tyurin and Sunita Williams began unpacking, inventorying and stowing the equipment and supplies brought to the ISS by Discovery, NASA officials in Houston said.

The crew entered the new supplies and equipment in the Inventory Management System, a computerized, bar-coded tool that keeps track of the material aboard the orbiting lab.

During the week, crew members also worked on experiments that analyze heart function during space flights of long duration, measured cosmic rays, and examined plant growth and changes in blood of long-duration space travelers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: ESA's next astronaut to go into space arrives at launch site

Related Stories

ESA's next astronaut to go into space arrives at launch site

August 19, 2015

ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen, Soyuz spacecraft commander Sergei Volkov and Kazakh cosmonaut Aidyn Aimbetov arrived in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, yesterday. This is their last destination before heading to the International Space ...

Russian cosmonauts wrap up spacewalk (Update)

August 10, 2015

Two Russian cosmonauts on Monday added new equipment outside the International Space Station and took pictures to study its exterior during a five-and-a-half hour spacewalk.

Recommended for you

Interstellar seeds could create oases of life

August 27, 2015

We only have one example of a planet with life: Earth. But within the next generation, it should become possible to detect signs of life on planets orbiting distant stars. If we find alien life, new questions will arise. ...

Dawn spacecraft sends sharper scenes from Ceres

August 25, 2015

The closest-yet views of Ceres, delivered by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, show the small world's features in unprecedented detail, including Ceres' tall, conical mountain; crater formation features and narrow, braided fractures.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.