Gengis Khan basecamp found in China

December 25, 2006

Chinese scholars have found a series of ancient wells they believe provided water for Genghis Khan's legendary hordes during their campaign in Western Xia.

The find led them to conclude Genghis Khan did indeed march through the city of Ordos on his expedition into Western Xia.

China's Xinhua news service said Monday more than 80 wells spaced 10 meters (33 feet) apart that were apparently used by the expedition's thousands of soldiers and horses.

The wells are believed to be part of the "100 Wells" cited in the ancient classic history, "The Untold Story of Mongolia," which recounts the history of the region and its Mongol raiders from 700 to 1240.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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