FDA OK May Spark 'Clone-Free' Labels

Dec 29, 2006
FDA OK May Spark 'Clone-Free' Labels (AP)
Cloned dairy cows Cyagra, left, and Genesis, right, share hay together as they eat at the farm of Greg Wiles in Williamsport, Md., Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2006. Federal scientists have concluded there is no difference between food from cloned animals and food from conventional livestock. (AP Photo/Chris Gardner)

(AP) -- Meat and milk from cloned animals may not appear in supermarkets for years despite being deemed by the government as safe to eat. But don't be surprised if "clone-free" labels appear sooner.



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