El Nino could last beyond spring

Dec 11, 2006

A University of Colorado weather expert has warned the El Nino weather pattern over the Pacific Ocean could survive past the upcoming spring.

Klaus Wolter said this year's version of the phenomenon is "pretty robust" and may survive to have an effect on the 2007 hurricane season, USA Today reported Monday.

The pattern has been largely credited with the calm 2006 hurricane season, and federal weather officials have said it is strengthening, a development that could lead to a warm and dry winter in the northern United States and increased precipitation in the southern parts of the country.

"The (nation's) midsection is always where you're rolling the dice," said Mark Svoboda, a climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center.

The possibility of rain may prove to be good news for drought-ravaged Texas and Florida, but could also cause mudslides in areas of California that were struck by wildfires in previous months.

El Nino's effects are being felt all over the world, with the World Meteorological Association saying Australia and Indonesia "are suffering severe drought" and Africa is receiving heavy rains.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: This has been a month of extreme weather around the world

Related Stories

Global climate on verge of multi-decadal change

May 28, 2015

A new study, by scientists from the University of Southampton and National Oceanography Centre (NOC), implies that the global climate is on the verge of broad-scale change that could last for a number of ...

El Nino will be 'substantial' warn Australian scientists

May 12, 2015

Australian scientists Tuesday forecast a "substantial" El Nino weather phenomenon for 2015, potentially spelling deadly and costly climate extremes, after officially declaring its onset in the tropical Pacific.

Warm oceans caused hottest Dust Bowl years in 1934/36

May 04, 2015

Two ocean hot spots have been found to be the potential drivers of the hottest summers on record for the Central US in 1934 and 1936. The research may also help modern forecasters predict particularly hot ...

Recommended for you

EPA says first day of oil spill spent 'planning'

5 hours ago

On the afternoon of the largest coastal oil spill in California in 25 years, graduate student Natalie Phares quickly organized a volunteer bucket brigade to clean a beach north of Santa Barbara.

Great Barrier Reef stays on UN watch list

11 hours ago

The Great Barrier Reef will remain under surveillance but not be listed as endangered, according to a draft recommendation to the UN's World Heritage Committee, published on Friday.

Food or fuel? How about both?

15 hours ago

In the United States, federal mandates to produce more renewable fuels, especially biofuels, have led to a growing debate: Should fuel or food grow on arable land? Recent research shows farmers can successfully, ...

Using desalination to address drought

15 hours ago

"It's a very interesting time in the water industry," says Carlos Riva '75, CEO of Poseidon Water, a company that is drawing attention as it develops, in Southern California, what will be the largest seawater ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.