Study finds certain drugs cut Alzheimer's

December 6, 2006

U.S. scientists say they've identified anti-hypertensive agents that can prevent cognitive decline and amyloid neuropathology in Alzheimer patients.

The research, conducted by Dr. Giulio Maria Pasinetti and colleagues at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, suggests a large number of geriatric patients under pharmacological treatment for high-blood pressure with certain anti-hypertensive drugs might also reap the benefits of the drug's cognitive effects.

Pasinetti's research is part of a growing push to identify and develop more effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

"There is no convincing evidence that there is any available drug presently on the market to cure Alzheimer's disease and there are many questions surrounding the effectiveness of drugs that are available to delay or effectively alleviate symptoms of memory deterioration or dementia," said Pasinetti.

During the past two years, researchers have begun screening drugs already commercially available for treatment of other disorders to determine their potential value in treating Alzheimer's disease and cognitive impairment.

Pasinetti's findings were presented Wednesday in New York during the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology's annual conference.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: High doses of Alzheimer's drug Aricept should be banned, Public Citizen says

Related Stories

Recent Drug Use Masks Cocaine Abusers' Cognitive Impairment

March 3, 2009

( -- Recent cocaine use may hide some of the cognitive deficits commonly experienced by individuals addicted to cocaine, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory report in ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.