China's autumn warmer than usual

December 6, 2006

The China Meteorological Administration has said the country has experienced its warmest autumn in more than half a century.

Zhang Qiang, assistant director-general of disaster relief with the organization, said temperatures were 35 degrees F warmer than normal for the time of year, Xinhua, China's official government-run news agency, reported Wednesday.

The 2006 autumn marked the country's warmest in 55 years.

The country has also had less rainfall than usual, with an average 4.3 inches falling on the country between September and November, about half an inch less than the historical average.

Zhang attributed the weather changes to unusual atmospheric circulation.

"From September to the first half of November, China has been dominated by a ridge of high pressure, which has caused higher temperatures and less rainfall," Zhang said.

Meteorologists in the country have predicted the country will experience a warmer winter than usual.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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